Austin Detwiler

Austin Detwiler

Austin Detwiler works for American Philanthropic, a consulting firm whose mission is to strengthen civil society by improving the effectiveness of charitable foundations and nonprofit organizations. Previously he was the Assistant Director of the Matthew J. Ryan Center at Villanova University, as well as an adjunct professor in their Augustine and Culture Seminar Program. His expertise includes grant writing, strategic planning, and donor communications. He serves on the boards of Martin Saints Classical High School and the Charlotte Mason Educational Center, and is a founding director of the Philadelphia Catholic Scholars Program.

Austin has a master’s degree in theology from Villanova University and bachelor’s in Philosophy and Political Theory from the Templeton Honors College. He lives with his family in Conshohocken, PA.

Reach Austin at austin@philanthropydaily.com.


naked philanthropist raises money for australian wildfires and moral questions
Lessons from the Naked Philanthropist: how helping Australian wildfires can harm culture

Kaylen Ward, known as “The Naked Philanthropist,” raised $1 million for the Australian wildfires by sending nude photographs. Her philanthropy receives less criticism than that of many major donors. What does this tell us?

charitable deduction not affecting long-term trends and fundamentals of fundraising
Chronicle of Philanthropy recognizes charitable deduction is not to blame for decrease in giving

Breaking news: the fundamentals of fundraising are not shifting due to tax policy—and years-old trends in giving are not shifting over night, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy.


war on philanthropy karl zinsmeister philanthropy as democracy not plutocracy
The war on philanthropy—and the war on careful thinking

Karl Zinsmeister’s recent Wall Street Journal article about the “war on philanthropy” has ruffled feathers—and stirred up some sloppy thinking.

Death by disassocation: a review of Them by Senator Ben Sasse

Loneliness is killing us. Ben Sasse’s latest book, “Them” addresses a growing health crisis today—loneliness—and the effect of loneliness on individual and communal health, as well as contemporary politics.


Top articles of 2019

Join us in taking a look back at our best articles from 2019.

Christmastide and charity: giving as self-emptying

Christmas remembers the birth of Christ, in which God “emptied himself” to become man. This self-emptying is instructive for our own generosity.


grantmakers nonprofits philanthropies
One awkward conversation

If program officers, foundation presidents, and other grantmaking representatives would commit to one awkward conversation with fundraisers, they could save everyone a great deal of time and energy.

Suspicion, trust, and Thanksgiving dinner

As Thanksgiving approaches, we see distrust and suspicion plaguing even our family life. But Thanksgiving also remains a crucial gathering time for families. We should use Thanksgiving dinner as an opportunity to avoid discord and instead to find non-political conversations.


Beyond left and right in politics

The political right and left are intellectually bankrupt, uninspiring, and unnuanced. We must rely on—and promote—philanthropy and the nonprofit sector to advance a healthy society.

NIO summit philanthropy fundraising
NextAfter’s NIO Summit: a recap

The 2019 Nonprofit Innovation & Optimization Summit hosted by NextAfter had a lot of extremely useful tips for fundraisers. At the same time, it had a major blind spot for providing comprehensive advice for nonprofit organizations.