Michael E. Hartmann

The Giving Review co-editor Michael E. Hartmann is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Strategic Giving at the Capital Research Center (CRC) in Washington, D.C. For more than 18 years, he served in various roles on the program staff of The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation in Milwaukee, including as its Director of Research.
Before joining Bradley in 1998, Hartmann was Director of Research at the Wisconsin Policy Research Institute. He has also been a consultant to other foundations and education-reform organizations.
Hartmann is a past Visiting Fellow of the Philanthropy Roundtable in Washington, D.C., where he researched and wrote Helping People to Help Themselves: A Guide for Donors. He is co-author of CRC’s The Flow of Funding to Conservative and Liberal Political Campaigns, Independent Groups, and Traditional Public Policy Organizations Before and After Citizens United, hailed as “an unprecedented study” by RealClearPolicy.
A graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, Hartmann has also published law-review articles on the constitutionality of school vouchers and aspects of welfare reform, as well as on the First Amendment and intellectual-property rights. He has written for National Affairs, National Review Online, City Journal, RealClearPolitics, RealClearPolicy, RealClearBooks, RealClearReligion, the Washington Examiner, Philanthropy, Philanthropy Daily, HistPhil, and CRC, as well.
Reach Michael at mhartmann@givingreview.com


A conversation with Brent Haglund about environmentalism, property ownership, and civil society (Part 2 of 2)

The retired “civic environmentalist” talks to Michael E. Hartmann and Daniel P. Schmidt about the Green New Deal, some successes of conservative environmentalism, and the perils of polarized philanthropic funding of environmental activity.

A conversation with Brent Haglund about environmentalism, property ownership, and civil society (Part 1 of 2)

The retired “civic environmentalist” talks to Michael E. Hartmann and Daniel P. Schmidt about Aldo Leopold, the Land Ethic, and the Sand County Foundation he led for more than three decades.


Revisiting benevolence, philanthropy, and identity in Civic Gifts

Elisabeth S. Clemens’ book—including its description of the March of Dimes, what would now be properly considered a “working charity,” in the polio crusade—impressively details questions about roles of, and relationship between, public and private sectors in meeting social challenges through American history.

A conversation with Jackpot author Michael Mechanic (Part 2 of 2)

The Mother Jones senior editor talks to Michael E. Hartmann about the need for more and better thinking about the proper role of philanthropy in a democracy and people’s fear about being on the wrong side of America’s economic divide.


A conversation with Jackpot author Michael Mechanic (Part 1 of 2)

The Mother Jones senior editor talks to Michael E. Hartmann about the state of journalism, including about philanthropy, and his new book on the super-rich, including their problems.

Philanthropy, charity, and The Wealth Hoarders

Chuck Collins’ new book about the “Wealth Defense Industry” references its philanthropic component’s managerial elite, about which there should be more honest truth-telling and analysis.


Digital dollars and donor demands

Technological tracking to trump trust—and risk trampling on it.

Money, morality, and musea

The elite arts-and-culture establishment, its echelons, and everyone else.


Pierre S. du Pont IV, R.I.P.

He wore his “IV” well, actually.