Michael E. Hartmann

The Giving Review co-editor Michael E. Hartmann is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Strategic Giving at the Capital Research Center (CRC) in Washington, D.C. He also curates RealClearPolicy’s “Philanthropy and Giving” section.

For almost 20 years, Hartmann served in various roles on the program staff of The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation in Milwaukee, including as its Director of Research. Before joining Bradley, he was Director of Research at the Wisconsin Policy Research Institute. He has been a consultant to other foundations and education-reform organizations, as well.

Hartmann is a past Visiting Fellow of the Philanthropy Roundtable in Washington, D.C., for which he researched and wrote Helping People to Help Themselves: A Guide for Donors. He is co-author of CRC’s The Flow of Funding to Conservative and Liberal Political Campaigns, Independent Groups, and Traditional Public Policy Organizations Before and After Citizens United, hailed as “an unprecedented study” by RealClearPolicy.

A graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, Hartmann has published law-review articles on the constitutionality of school vouchers and aspects of welfare reform, as well as on the First Amendment and intellectual-property rights.

He has written for National Affairs, City Journal, Law & Liberty, National Review Online, The American Conservative, RealClearPolitics, RealClearPolicy, RealClearBooks, RealClearReligion, the Washington Examiner, Philanthropy, Philanthropy Daily, and HistPhil.

Reach Michael at mhartmann@givingreview.com.


Robert Wuthnow’s Why Religion is Good for American Democracy and philanthropy

More receptivity to and respect for faith at the top of establishment grantmaking in the country might be beneficial, too.

Enchanted with the elitist of exempt endowments

Policymakers, protection, and power.


“Intermediate sanctions” against abuses of tax exemption, 25 years after their enactment

Looking back at a previous, successful attempt to reform the nonprofit sector, with the lawyer and author who literally wrote the book on it.

For fun, philanthropic pharmacology

Pondering pills, considering colors.


A conversation with Puck founding partner Teddy Schleifer (Part 2 of 2)

The journalist talks to Michael E. Hartmann about the different factors motivating Silicon Valley giving, scrutiny of and transparency in philanthropy, progressive and populist critiques of grantmakers, and the prospects for future reform of nonprofitdom.

A conversation with Puck founding partner Teddy Schleifer (Part 1 of 2)

The journalist talks to Michael E. Hartmann about his new media platform, the state of coverage of and commentary about philanthropy, and the shift in American giving to Silicon Valley.


Kyrgyzstan journal

Brief insights from an area of utmost geopolitical, religious, and cultural significance.

A conversation with Civic Gifts author Elisabeth S. Clemens (Part 2 of 2)

The University of Chicago sociologist talks to Michael E. Hartmann about the political construction of philanthropy and charity, current strains on that construction, a potential revival of mutual aid, and what it might mean for our us all as a nation.


A conversation with Civic Gifts author Elisabeth S. Clemens (Part 1 of 2)

The University of Chicago sociologist talks to Michael E. Hartmann about politics in social life, Presidents Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt, the March of Dimes, and the power of voluntarism.

More awake than a college kid on energy drinks during finals week

“At a time when philanthropy faces mounting critiques,” the Council on Foundation’s new strategic plan proves it’s not up to the challenge of facing those critiques.