Michael E. Hartmann

Michael E. Hartmann

The Giving Review co-editor Michael E. Hartmann is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Strategic Giving at the Capital Research Center (CRC) in Washington, D.C. For more than 18 years, he served in various roles on the program staff of The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation in Milwaukee, including as its Director of Research.
Before joining Bradley in 1998, Hartmann was Director of Research at the Wisconsin Policy Research Institute. He has also been a consultant to other foundations and education-reform organizations.
Hartmann is a past Visiting Fellow of the Philanthropy Roundtable in Washington, D.C., where he researched and wrote Helping People to Help Themselves: A Guide for Donors. He is co-author of CRC’s The Flow of Funding to Conservative and Liberal Political Campaigns, Independent Groups, and Traditional Public Policy Organizations Before and After Citizens United, hailed as “an unprecedented study” by RealClearPolicy.
A graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, Hartmann has also published law-review articles on the constitutionality of school vouchers and aspects of welfare reform, as well as on the First Amendment and intellectual-property rights. He has written for National Affairs, National Review Online, City Journal, RealClearPolitics, RealClearPolicy, RealClearBooks, RealClearReligion, the Washington Examiner, Philanthropy, Philanthropy Daily, HistPhil, and CRC, as well.
Reach Michael at mhartmann@givingreview.com


Scholars convincingly urge increased academic study of elite philanthropy

Professors make strong case for high-status grantmaking to be taken more seriously within management and organizational research. Such increased attention would be well-warranted, including from much-wider circles.

A conversation with Hoover Institution senior fellow John H. Cochrane

The finance economist and popular blogger talks to Michael E. Hartmann about nonprofitdom’s tax-favored legal structure, which he thinks we should consider scrapping.


Like actual jackpots, Jackpot loses a little luster after a winning beginning

Michael Mechanic’s forthcoming book well-describes “how the super-rich really live,” then promotes a progressive social-justice agenda that would supposedly prevent wealth from “harming us all.”

A conversation with philanthropy journalist Marc Gunther (Part 2 of 2)

The veteran reporter and commentator talks to Michael E. Hartmann about grantmaking and respect for individual agency, and the state of reporting and commentary on funders.


A conversation with philanthropy journalist Marc Gunther (Part 1 of 2)

The veteran reporter and commentator talks to Michael E. Hartmann about his in-depth examination of Michael Bloomberg’s grantmaking against flavored e-cigarettes, and what it says about the nature and effects of much of progressive philanthropy.

A conversation with the Fordham Institute’s Chester E. Finn, Jr. (Part 2 of 2)

The education scholar, activist, and philanthropist talks to Michael E. Hartmann and Daniel P. Schmidt about the current states of philanthropy, school choice, and history and civics education.


A conversation with the Fordham Institute’s Chester E. Finn, Jr. (Part 1 of 2)

The education scholar, activist, and philanthropist talks to Michael E. Hartmann and Daniel P. Schmidt about his mentor Daniel Patrick Moynihan and the current state of conservatism.


Elites, barstools, raw beauty, and a (philanthropic) “George Option”

The Gathering’s Fred Smith calls a thought-provoking, almost-jarring question—for us all, but perhaps for conservatism and conservative philanthropy in particular.