Michael E. Hartmann

Michael E. Hartmann

The Giving Review co-editor Michael E. Hartmann is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Strategic Giving at the Capital Research Center (CRC) in Washington, D.C. For more than 18 years, he served in various roles on the program staff of The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation in Milwaukee, including as its Director of Research.

Before joining Bradley in 1998, Hartmann was Director of Research at the Wisconsin Policy Research Institute. He has also been a consultant to other foundations and education-reform organizations.

Hartmann is a past Visiting Fellow of the Philanthropy Roundtable in Washington, D.C., where he researched and wrote Helping People to Help Themselves: A Guide for Donors. He is co-author of CRC’s The Flow of Funding to Conservative and Liberal Political Campaigns, Independent Groups, and Traditional Public Policy Organizations Before and After Citizens United, hailed as “an unprecedented study” by RealClearPolicy.

A graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, Hartmann has also published law-review articles on the constitutionality of school vouchers and aspects of welfare reform, as well as on the First Amendment and intellectual-property rights. He has written for National Affairs, National Review Online, City Journal, RealClearPolitics, RealClearPolicy, RealClearBooks, RealClearReligion, the Washington Examiner, Philanthropy, Philanthropy Daily, HistPhil, and CRC, as well.

Reach Michael at mhartmann@givingreview.com


Political and charitable contributions “crowding out” each other, consumptively

The two different types of giving are substitutive, researchers find. If so, there would be implications worth exploration.

A conversation with the Acton Institute’s Samuel Gregg (Part 2 of 2)

The moral philosopher and political economist speaks with Daniel P. Schmidt and Michael E. Hartmann about freedom and faith, economic nationalism and the working class, philanthropy and ideas, and faith and reason.


A conversation with the Acton Institute’s Samuel Gregg (Part 1 of 2)

The moral philosopher and political economist speaks with Daniel P. Schmidt and Michael E. Hartmann about differing emphases in papal thinking and teaching about capitalism and markets, the Vatican’s circles of engagement in consultations about them, and divisions within American conservatism today.

Philanthropy plays part in Darren Dochuk’s history of how oil-industry leaders transformed America

Organized standardization and independent wildcatting can show up in grantmaking, too.


A welcome jolt

The benefits of an unexpected, foundational question.

A conversation with philanthropy historian and journalist Benjamin Soskis (Part 2 of 2)

The Urban Institute researcher and HistPhil co-editor speaks with Michael E. Hartmann about what the study of history brings to the practice of grantmaking, the challenges and opportunities currently facing those conservatives and progressives who are critiquing giving, and the difference between charity and philanthropy.


A conversation with philanthropy historian and journalist Benjamin Soskis (Part 1 of 2)

The Urban Institute researcher speaks with Michael E. Hartmann about how he came to study the history of philanthropy and the origins of the HistPhil website he co-edits.

Playing the philanthropic “long game”

Just as with “pulling the goalie,” properly assess the future, but in this case to “skate to the puck.” Don’t wait to skate—or, again analogizing to grantmaking, to spend.


Claremont Institute’s Matthew Peterson critiques conservative donor class

Twitter thread provocatively lets loose on problems and shortcomings, challenges and opportunities.

Philanthropically “pulling the goalie” earlier

Analogically, assessing the right risks of waiting to spend.