Michael E. Hartmann

Michael E. Hartmann

The Giving Review co-editor Michael E. Hartmann is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Strategic Giving at the Capital Research Center (CRC) in Washington, D.C. For more than 18 years, he served in various roles on the program staff of The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation in Milwaukee, including as its Director of Research.
Before joining Bradley in 1998, Hartmann was Director of Research at the Wisconsin Policy Research Institute. He has also been a consultant to other foundations and education-reform organizations.
Hartmann is a past Visiting Fellow of the Philanthropy Roundtable in Washington, D.C., where he researched and wrote Helping People to Help Themselves: A Guide for Donors. He is co-author of CRC’s The Flow of Funding to Conservative and Liberal Political Campaigns, Independent Groups, and Traditional Public Policy Organizations Before and After Citizens United, hailed as “an unprecedented study” by RealClearPolicy.
A graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, Hartmann has also published law-review articles on the constitutionality of school vouchers and aspects of welfare reform, as well as on the First Amendment and intellectual-property rights. He has written for National Affairs, National Review Online, City Journal, RealClearPolitics, RealClearPolicy, RealClearBooks, RealClearReligion, the Washington Examiner, Philanthropy, Philanthropy Daily, HistPhil, and CRC, as well.
Reach Michael at mhartmann@givingreview.com


A conversation with Johns Hopkins University professor Steven M. Teles (Part 2 of 2)

The political scientist and author talks to Michael E. Hartmann about “compassionate conservatism,” the Never Trump movement, and the post-Trump future of conservatism—including how conservative philanthropy should consider the challenges of, and opportunities available in, facing that future.

A conversation with Johns Hopkins University professor Steven M. Teles (Part 1 of 2)

The political scientist and author talks to Michael E. Hartmann about the nature of philanthropic support for the conservative legal movement, what it can teach foundations now, and what grantmakers can do about “organizational disequilibrium.”


A conversation with American Awakening author Joshua Mitchell (Part 2 of 2)

The Georgetown University professor talks to Daniel P. Schmidt and Michael E. Hartmann about philanthropy as a supplement to justice, our commitment to liberty, and trusting the “deplorable” to govern themselves.

A conversation with American Awakening author Joshua Mitchell (Part 1 of 2)

The Georgetown University professor talks to Daniel P. Schmidt and Michael E. Hartmann about what identity politics has done to charity and philanthropy.


Benefiting from information at the philanthropic top of a pyramid

Or what used to be a pyramid—and may be again, albeit pixelated.


Charitable giving is the lifeblood of social capital, according to Mike Lee

And he wants more of it to flow, and from more people.

What givers can learn from Clarence in It’s a Wonderful Life

An important charitable lesson from the classic Christmas film.


“Tax expenditures” on charitable deduction to total estimated $56.1 billion in 2020

Highest-income individuals use deduction the most and get biggest benefit from it, according to Joint Committee on Taxation.