A blog by William Schambra, Daniel Schmidt, and Michael Hartmann. Learn more->

06
Dec
2022
Philanthropy in Control

Adam Rutherford’s new book about eugenics reminds us again of those progressive foundations that supported it—and that it’s long past time for a full and fair accounting of them for what they funded and fomented, and why.


03
Nov
2022

14
Oct
2022
Revisiting conservatism, philanthropy, and The Dying Citizen

A work to read in “the Wilderness.”


23
Sep
2022
Some narrowness in longtermism

The short of it: in his new book’s ambitious thinking about the “full scale of human history,” William MacAskill undervalues the past—by definition, but more than needed—and elides in practice what that thinking could perhaps offer those of a different ideological worldview.


15
Aug
2022
Data and drama, studies and stories, and guidance for philanthropic decision-makers from Wild Problems

The popular EconTalk podcast host Russ Roberts’ new book offers a helpful insight to any grantmakers willing to receive it—and self-aware enough to risk considering themselves as essentially engaged in art, not science.


06
Jul
2022
Thoughts on philanthropy from books featured in The Giving Review in first half of 2022

A mid-year collection of interesting and insightful passages.


29
Jun
2022
Thomas Piketty proposes specific tax scale for nonprofit endowments

Don’t miss influential author, in new book, floating idea “in order to avoid an excessive concentration of power within a small number of entities and to enable less wealthy entities to develop.”


14
Jun
2022
Differences, and the risk of similarities, between government and private grantmaking

Claire Dunning’s impressive new history on government support of nonprofits in Boston offers helpful insights for private philanthropy.


02
Jun
2022

19
May
2022
Philanthropy in The Rise and Fall of the Neoliberal Order

Historian Gary Gerstle’s new book on America in what he considers the bygone free-market era includes a role for philanthropy in its narrative—well, at least in its purportedly “Powell-ian” rise, anyway.