Michael E. Hartmann

Michael E. Hartmann is senior fellow and director of the new Center for Strategic Giving at the Capital Research Center. For more than 18 years, he served on the program staff of The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation in Milwaukee, including as its director of research. He assisted Bradley’s vice president for program in administering the foundation’s grantmaking in K-12 education, employee rights, economic growth and prosperity, energy and the environment, law and legal reform, equal opportunity and individual liberty, and family and society. He is a past visiting fellow of the Philanthropy Roundtable in Washington, D.C., where he researched and wrote Helping People to Help Themselves:  A Guide for Donors. Before joining Bradley in 1998, he was director of research at the Wisconsin Policy Research Institute.

A graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, Hartmann has published law-review articles on the constitutionality of school vouchers and aspects of welfare reform, as well as on the First Amendment and intellectual-property rights. He has also been a consultant to other foundations and education-reform organizations.

A conversation with the American Enterprise Institute’s Rick Hess (Part 2 of 2)

The education scholar speaks with Michael E. Hartmann about “big-R” and “little-r” reform, “big-P” and “little-p” philanthropy, school choice, and an “ivory tower of our own.”

A conversation with the American Enterprise Institute’s Rick Hess (Part 1 of 2)

The education scholar speaks with Michael E. Hartmann about teaching, his early career, public-sector reform, and private-sector philanthropy.

The foundation program staffer as intelligence officer

A good way to think about it.

Gertrude Himmelfarb’s appreciation of the Victorian “Age of Philanthropy”

And her response to those who consider it a device for “social control.”

The price of prayer

Examining whether “thoughts and prayers” substitute for or complement material help.

Amazingly visualizing “giving like Newton”

“Presentism” (over-)confidently relies on mere dots.

Virginia Walden Ford’s is the great American story

A role reversal, and its own grand renewal.

Nonprofit employment is rising, in raw numbers and at a rapid rate

Those who care about the sector should be a little unsettled.

A conversation with the Hewlett Foundation’s Daniel Stid (Part 2 of 2)

The Madison Initiative director talks about Congress, the initiative’s grantees, and “philanthropic pluralism.”