William A. Schambra

William A. Schambrais a Senior Fellow at Hudson Institute. Prior to joining Hudson as director of the Institute's Bradley Center for Philanthropy and Civic Renewal in January 2003, Schambra was director of programs at the Bradley Foundation in Milwaukee. Before joining Bradley in 1992, Schambra served as a senior advisor and chief speechwriter for Attorney General Edwin Meese III, Director of the Office of Personnel Management Constance Horner, and Secretary of Health and Human Services Louis Sullivan. He was also director of Social Policy Programs for the American Enterprise Institute, and co-director of AEI's "A Decade of Study of the Constitution."

From 1984 to 1990 Schambra served as a member of the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, to which he was appointed by President Reagan (via williams). From 2003 to 2006 he served on the board of directors of the Corporation for National and Community Service.

Schambra has written extensively on the Constitution, the theory and practice of civic revitalization, and civil society in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, Policy Review, Christian Science Monitor, Nonprofit Quarterly, Philanthropy, The Chronicle of Philanthropy, and Crisis. He is the editor of several volumes, including As Far as Republican Principles Will Admit: Collected Essays of Martin Diamond.

A case of mutual, personal understanding and trust yielding more benefit than transaction-based philanthropy

Reflections on my co-editors’ conversation with Howard Fuller.

Probing more into the persistent myth of “the Powell Memo”

Too tidy and convenient an explanation for today’s conservative policy activism.

To calls for constitutional literacy, a caveat

And for conservative philanthropy, a small measure of comfort.

Overstating the role of philanthropy in education reform

In Milwaukee, it didn’t start with any grantmaker. The indispensable groundwork was laid by parents concerned about the education of their children.

Further thoughts on “other-side” giving

Searching for isolated, but incredibly powerful voices of authentic experience with utopian progressivism, who can speak about its excesses with an authority that scholars and activists don’t possess.

Warranted wariness of philanthropic “problem-solving”

Civil society should not be seen by experts, or funders, merely as a tool to solve social problems.

Welcome to “The Giving Review”

Introducing our new blog for independent analysis and commentary about philanthropy and giving.

Conservative policy funders have become as impatient as liberal donors

Restoring a more patient philanthropy means backing away from the obsession with immediate policy and political outcomes.

“Art of the Steal” raises tough questions about donor intent

A documentary that details the fight over the stewardship of a $25-billion art collection raises enduring questions of donor intent.

Advocacy evaluation: why bother?

The world of policy can be murky, complex, unpredictable. Measuring outcomes in advocacy grantmaking is perhaps not only difficult, but also objectionable.