Martin Morse Wooster

Martin Morse Wooster

Martin Morse Wooster is senior fellow at the Capital Research Center. He is the author of three books: Angry Classrooms, Vacant Minds (Pacific Research Institute, 1994), The Great Philanthropists and the Problem of ‘Donor Intent’ (Capital Research Center, 1994; revised 1998, 2007, and 2017), and Great Philanthropic Mistakes (Hudson Institute, 2006; revised 2010). His monographs about philanthropy include Should Foundations Live Forever? (Capital Research Center, 1998), The Foundation Builders (Philanthropy Roundtable, 2000), Return to Charity? (Capital Research Center, 2000), By Their Bootstraps (Manhattan Institute, 2002), and Games Universities Play (Pope Center, 2011). His articles and reviews have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Washington Times, American Spectator, Chronicle of Philanthropy, Commentary, Elle, Air and Space, Esquire, Philanthropy, Policy Review, Reader’s Digest, Reason, and Washingtonian.

Wooster frequently comments on philanthropic issues for newspapers, magazines, and television in the U.S. and Great Britain. He has contributed to the Encyclopedia of Philanthropy, the Encyclopedia of Civil Rights, and Notable American Philanthropists.

Wooster was formerly an editor at The American Enterprise, Reason, the Wilson Quarterly, and Harper’s Magazine. He was graduated from Beloit College with degrees in history and philosophy.


Success Academy charter schools provide an interesting approach to education

Success Academy charter schools attempt to combine the best of traditional and progressive educational methods in order to provide inner-city New Yorkers the best education available.

How much control should the government have over charter schools?

Charter schools are funded by public and private dollars, raising the question as to how much government control they should be under. The first in a two-part series.


Barron Hilton dies age 91, leaving his fortune to the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

Prior to his death, Barron Hilton and the Hilton Foundation took measures to protect Conrad Hilton’s donor intent. These are important measures for ensuring donor intent, and time will tell the foundation board’s commitment to these measures.

Bernie Marcus plans to sunset his foundation after his death

In order to protect donor intent, Bernie Marcus, Home Depot founder and Atlanta mega-donor, plans to give away 90 percent of his fortune—within 30 years of his death.


How occupational licensing blocks employees from entering the workforce

Broad occupational licensing laws serve to block too many applicants from the workforce—especially reformed ex-criminals.

The Kochs and the Pews

Similarities and differences between the two philanthropic brother duos.


Newly unearthed documents reveal heiress Cordelia Scaife May’s philanthropic legacy

The legacy of a mid-century environmentalist socialite whose laser-focused philanthropy helped sow the seeds of anti-immigration policy

How NYC nonprofits use public money to promote their political agendas

Next time you see protesters picketing something in Manhattan, be aware that a third—or more—of their salaries comes from New York City and the state of New York.


Legal battle over Kurtis Froedtert’s wishes, a warning to donors everywhere

A legal battle developing in Milwaukee over the wishes of philanthropist Kurtis Froedtert ought to remind donors everywhere to be very careful in how their wills are phrased.

Teach for America and charter schools: an unholy alliance?

Do funders supporting Teach for America and charter schools wield too much power to determine where teachers are placed?